Why Do We Cook More in a Crisis?

Why Do We Cook More in a Crisis?
16 March, 2020
girl preparing pasta
Why Do We Cook More in a Crisis?

It’s a control issue! In times of stress, people want to take control of the situation. If you’re stuck at home and you can’t leave, there’s not much you can do. You do some cleaning, but one of the few things you can do to take control is to start cooking for yourself and your family

That’s what Marc Luxen, the author of ‘The Cook, The Diner and The Mind, The Psychology in the Kitchen and at the Table,’ said to us.  Discover the full interview that answer the question "Why do we cook more in a crisis?"

 

 

“Food is related to control, but it’s also comforting,” says Luxen.

“Food is one of the ultimate comforters in life and that’s especially true in Italy, with the Mamma’s pasta and so on.”

The classic Italian cuisine is what Italians go back to again and again. The tried and tested recipes, the food they grew up on, cooked by their grandmothers and mothers. There is a wholesomeness and nourishment in the idea of cooking and eating what people did in far harder times. People cooked these dishes in peacetime and in war, it fed them through much more challenging times, it can feed us now.

“I think it would be really interesting to see some cultural differences between different countries dealing with coronavirus, what supermarkets sell out of first,” says Luxen.

“Just to generalise a little bit, perhaps the Dutch, the Irish or the English might not run so fast to the kitchen to deal with the situation, but I can see the Italians or the French would do that a lot more.

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