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Geoduck: The Giant Clam You've Got to Try

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Geoduck: The Giant Clam You've Got to Try

Mud duck, king clam, Mirugai, giant clam or elephant-trunk clam (we kid you not!)  - these are all names for the Geoduck clam, pronounced "gooey-duck," which hint at the unique characteristics of this edible clam you might have never seen, let alone tasted.

Whatever you call them, these extraordinary looking mighty molluscs come with some pretty weighty credentials as well as being both delicious and nutritious.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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What is geoduck?

These large, edible saltwater clams hail from the Hiatellidae family and are native to the coastal waters of western Canada and the northwest United States.

Not are the only the deepest burying clam in the world, they are also the longest living animal of any type - with an average lifespan of 140 years. They can also grow to be enormous, with reports of these saltwater clams reaching up to 2 metres and over 6 kg in weight. And, most importantly, they taste delicious, far better than they might look.

The geoduck is formed in two parts, made up of a long neck or siphon which sticks out of the shell and is perfect enjoyed raw. Inside the shell is a thicker body that lends itself to more robust preparations.

Take a look at this fascinating short clip on how geoducks are harvested in the wild:

How to Eat Geoduck

The prized mollusc is revered by fans for both its crunchy texture and sweet and clean flavour.

The seafood delicacy is particularly prized in Hong Kong, China and Japan, where its high prices command some careful preparation techniques where its often eaten sashimi style or cooked in a Chinese hot pot. In Korea, chefs frequently also serve geoduck raw, with hot chili sauce, or in fiery soups and stir-fries.

In Japan, geoduck or mirugai (giant clam) are used for sashimi and sushi. Watch master sushi chef Kotaro Kumita make omakase with geoduck in the masterful clip below:

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