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Before and After: Famous Chefs Reinterpret Traditional Italian Dishes

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Before and After: Famous Chefs Reinterpret Traditional Italian Dishes

Italian gastronomy is deeply rooted in tradition so one has to wonder: how do famous Italian chefs blend tradition and innovation in their kitchens? 

You'll get some answers from these amazing before and after shots comparing homemade traditional Italian foods with the gourmet versions chefs like Carlo Cracco and Gualtiero Marchesi dish up at their Michelin-starred restaurants.

How does Marchesi turn a simple saffron risotto into an edible work of art complete with a gold leaf garnish? Or how does spaghetti carbonara get deconstructed and who was bold enough to add bergamot and capers to Italy's famous tiramisu?  

Find out by feasting your eyes on these mouthwatering reinterpretations of traditional Italian foods:

CARBONARA: FROM ROME TO LAKE GARDA

Classic carbonara becomes a pasta dish with trout in the hands of chef Leandro Luppi from Vecchia Malcesine restaurant. Which traditional ingredients remain in the recipe? Eggs, fresh pepper and spaghetti.

SAFFRON RISOTTO: FROM MILAN TO GUALTIERO MARCHESI

 

On the bottom you'll find the most iconic dish from the great master Gualtiero Marchesi: risotto with saffron and edible gold leaf. It's easy to see the different between the homemade version and his stellar recipe, right? 

MILANESE CUTLET: FROM SIMPLE TO CRACCO'S 'DONE WRONG'

 

The Milanese cutlet is a favorite in Lombardy, that's why it seems impossible that Milanese chef Carlo Cracco would come up with a recipe 'done wrong'. In his version all of the ingredients of the breading are served on the side to highlight the delicate flavor of the meat. 

TIRAMISU: FROM COFFEE TO CAPERS

 

How is tiramisu served at a two-Michelin starred restaurant? Alessandro Negrini and Fabio Pisani transform this classic Italian dessert using this creative recipe.

 

PARMIGIANA: ALFONSO IACCARINO'S EGGPLANT TOWER

The ingredients remain the same but chef Alfonso Iaccarino makes his eggplant parmesan look more like a stack of pancakes than what la nonna serves during Sunday lunch.

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